Salt Cay being ignored Member Native demand better

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:edwin astwood, josephine connolly, LONG BAY HIGH SCHOOL, salt cay Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 25 Jan 2016 – When the Member of Parliament for Salt Cay and At Large Member native to Salt Cay pointed out subpar treatment there, they revealed a number of situations unfair to residents on the tiny island. Hon Edwin Astwood said one teacher/principal at the government school is unacceptable. Astwood pointed out during House debate Monday that the school and its six students deserve the same treatment as Long Bay High, which is new with 200 students. Hon Josephine Connolly was vocal about the condition of the steps to board the ferry commuting between Grand Turk and Salt Cay. The Deputy House speaker said its dilapidated and has been for too long posing a dangerous inconvenience. Premier Hon Rufus responded with agreement and promise. A commitment from the Education Minister, he said to get another educator at the Mary Robinson school. The Premier expressed that the rebuild of the dock steps is long overdue and will be repaired soon. Change is on the horizon says PDM Leader Sharlene Cartwright Robinson Connolly claims Premier raising smokescreen Overgrown bush moved by MPs and TCEM Recommended for youlast_img read more

Old Globe brings community voices to stage

first_img Posted: June 19, 2018 Updated: 11:56 AM June 19, 2018 Old Globe brings community voices to stage Sasha Foo center_img Sasha Foo, 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – Have you ever wondered what it might be like to write a play and have it produced? San Diego’s Old Globe is giving community members the change to become playwrights.On Tuesday, we joined the audience at a Skyline Hills senior center for the debut of a work by first time playwright Claudia Thompson. As a participant in the Old Globe’s Community Voices program, Thompson began writing about the life of Elizabeth Hobbs Keckley.Keckley was a former Virginia slave who bought her freedom from her owners, and became a dressmaker and close confidante to First Lady Mary Lincoln. The setting for the inaugural performance of the play was the George Stevens Resource Center where members were celebrating Juneteenth, a holiday that originated in Texas to mark freedom from slavery and is now observed in African-American communities around the nation.Thompson’s play about the 19th century White House dressmaker, businesswoman and philanthropist is a product of the Old Globe’s playwriting and arts engagement programs. At age 74, Thompson said she never imagined that her writing would ever make it to the stage. “It’s just extraordinary that that path was there, and I was able to walk on that path, at this time of my life,” Thompson said.Katie Harroff who teaches the community writing classes said there are many other voices waiting to be heard. “I mean Claudia is a very special woman. It takes a very special person to be passionate enough to get to this place with your writing, but the wonderful thing about these programs is we’re finding people like that all over San Diego.”Thompson’s play, “Elizabeth Hobbs Keckley” will be performed again on Sunday, June 24 at Hattox Hall at The Old Globe. Seats must be reserved for the 12:30 p.m. and 4:00 p.m. performances. Tickets are free! Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

Trump Twitter Facebook Google are colluding to silence conservatives

first_imgPresident Donald Trump said “we have to do something” about social media companies.  Getty Images President Donald Trump is again alleging that social media companies are biased against conservatives.During a joint press conference with Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro on Tuesday, Trump said “we have to do something” about social media companies discriminating against conservatives on their platforms. “Something is happening with those groups of folks that are running Facebook, Google and Twitter,” said Trump. “I do think we have to get to the bottom of it … It’s collusive and it’s very, very fair to say that we have to do something about it.”Trump’s comments came after he was asked whether he’d consider laws that made social media platforms liable for content posted on their sites and his support for a $250 million lawsuit against Twitter over allegations of “shadow banning” conservatives. “It’s different from what it used to be. Things are happening, names are taken off, people aren’t getting through,” said Trump. “It seems to be if they’re conservative, if they’re Republicans, if they’re in a certain group, there’s discrimination, big discrimination.”Neither the White House nor Facebook nor Google immediately responded to requests for comment. Twitter declined to comment. This isn’t Trump’s first time alleging that social media companies are silencing conservative voices on their platforms. In August, Trump took to Twitter to accuse social media companies of “totally discriminating against Republican/Conservative voices.” His tweets also came amid more general concerns among some conservatives about perceived bias on the part of social media and tech companies.On Tuesday, Facebook apologized to Trump’s social media director, Dan Scavino, for temporarily blocking some contents on his account on Monday, according to CNN Business. Facebook’s artificial intelligence system reportedly mistook Scavino for a bot.  Tags Share your voice 8 Comments Politics Internet Mobile Digital Media Facebook Googlelast_img read more

N Zealand expels US diplomat

first_imgA US diplomat has been expelled from New Zealand after Washington refused to waive diplomatic immunity so police investigating a serious crime could question him, officials said.Details of the alleged crime have not been revealed but local media reported the diplomat left the South Pacific nation last week suffering a broken nose and black eye.Foreign Affairs Minister Murray McCully said he was “disappointed” at the US refusal to waive immunity and in response asked for the person’s withdrawal from New Zealand.”Officials in Wellington and our ambassador in Washington DC have clearly conveyed to the United States the expectation that foreign diplomats obey the law in New Zealand and are seen to face justice in New Zealand,” he said in a statement released to AFP Monday.Police said they were called to an incident in Lower Hutt, on Wellington’s outskirts, in the early hours of March 12, which “involved an individual from the US embassy in Wellington”.By the time they arrived the person had left the scene and no arrests were made.Attempts to further investigate hit a diplomatic brick wall.McCully said foreign affairs officials relayed a police request to waive immunity but their US counterparts refused.Local media named the diplomat as Colin White and said he left Wellington with his wife and children.TVNZ, which broke the story, reported that White was a technical attaché who had been working closely with New Zealand’s intelligence service, the GCSB.A spokeswoman for the US embassy said they were “communicating with New Zealand authorities” on the issue.”As a matter of policy, we do not comment on the specifics of matters under investigation,” she said in a statement.”We take seriously any suggestion that our staff have fallen short of the high standards of conduct expected of US government personnel.”McCully said the US had stated it always fully investigated all allegations involving its diplomatic staff.Diplomatic immunity, formalised in the 1961 Vienna Convention, means foreign envoys are protected from local law enforcement in the country to which they are posted.The most recent known case of it being invoked in New Zealand was in 2014, when Malaysian military attaché Mohammed Rizalman bin Ismail was accused of indecent assault.It was eventually revoked and Rizalman was sentenced to nine months’ home detention after being found guilty in a Wellington court.last_img read more

Man who torched cops car claimed to be arrested

first_imgA group of young men seen vandalising and torching a police vehicle in front of BNP`s Naya Paltan central office in the capital on 14 Nov, 2018. Photo: CollectedPolice on Thursday arrested a man who allegedly torched a car of Dhaka metropolitan Police (DMP) in front of the BNP office in the capital’s Naya Paltan on 14 November, 2018, reports UNB.The arrestee was identified as Wasim.Additional police superintendent of Detective Branch (DMP) Md Abdul Baten in a press briefing in the afternoon said a special team of Pallabi police arrested Wasim during a drive in Bihari Camp of Pallabi.So far, a total of 14 people have been arrested over the clash and vandalism of 14 November and all of them are BNP activists, he said.Wasim confessed to his involvement in torching the police car during the primary interrogation, he added.A fierce clash broke out between police and BNP leaders and activists in front of the party’s Naya Paltan central office on 14 November, leaving an unspecified number of people injured while at least two police vans were torched and some other vehicles vandalised.last_img

Study Its easier to be a none in Canada than in the

first_img By: John Longhurst News Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Share This! As Amazon burns, Vatican prepares for summit on region’s faith and sustainabilit … August 30, 2019 Share This! By: John Longhurst Columns • Opinion • Simran Jeet Singh: Articles of Faith Share This! Catholicism Share This! John Longhurst,Add Comment Click here to post a comment Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.,Survey: 1 in 3 Protestants think more stories of abuse by pastors yet to come center_img Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email By: John Longhurst We are not all the same, and in our difference we are divine August 30, 2019 Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Instagram apostasy stirs controversy over Christian ‘influencers’ August 30, 2019 TagsAmerican evangelicals American religion Canada homepage featured nones United States,You may also like Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,About the authorView All Posts John Longhurst ‘Who will be our Rachel now?’ Progressives reflect on movement without Held Evans Share This! Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,(RNS) — Nearly a quarter of Canadians today say they have no religious affiliation — about the same as in the U.S. But a forthcoming book by two Canadian researchers says that it is easier to be a “none” in Canada.“It’s more normal in Canada to say you have no religion,” said Sarah Wilkins-Laflamme, a professor of sociology at the University of Waterloo and author, with Joel Thiessen, professor of sociology at Ambrose University, of “None of the Above: Having No Religion in Canada and the U.S.”“In Canada, there is a more accepting social environment for leaving religion. There’s less of a social stigma,” added Thiessen.The two researchers decided to study nones in Canada when they found most of the information about the rapidly expanding group of religiously unaffiliated came from the U.S.“We wanted to see what was similar, what was different,” said Wilkins-Laflamme.The big difference, they found, is that the decline in religious affiliation started earlier in Canada.Just 4% of Canadians said they had no religion in 1971. The number spiked to 12% in 1991 and 17% in 2001. The nones’ rise began later in the U.S., from 5% in 1972 to 8% in 1990 before jumping to 14% in 2000.Photo by Ali Tawfiq/Unsplash/Creative CommonsAs the notion of being nonaffiliated caught hold more quickly in Canada, it seemed more normal sooner, the researchers said.At the same time, evangelicalism continues to have a much stronger influence in the U.S. than it does in Canada. This, along with a stronger sense of Christian nationhood in the U.S., makes it harder for some Americans to “come out” as having no religion, the researchers say, noting that in parts of the U.S. “a fervent stigma exists toward those in the religious none community.”With religion playing a less important role in Canadian public life, Canadians don’t view their country as a “Christian nation.” That also makes it increasingly easier for Canadians to say they don’t belong to any religious group.If anything, the researchers say, “rather than stigmatizing religious none identification, there is a sense among some that the stigma is reserved in part for those who are overly religious.”The researchers also said that Canada’s official policy of multiculturalism makes it easier for Canadians to be nonreligious.“Canadians are exposed to lots of worldviews,” says Wilkins-Laflamme. “They grow up realizing their view is one among many.”Wilkins-Laflamme and Thiessen said that the lack of religion in so many Canadian homes makes a return to religion by Canadian nones unlikely.“As the religious none population has grown in recent decades, it is more common for children to be born into families with parents who say they have no religion,” they say.In contrast to previous generations, where nominally religious parents may have exposed their children to some religious beliefs and rituals, religious nones today “are raising their children without any formal exposure to religious beliefs or behaviors in the home, at school and in the community.”There is “nothing, socially speaking, that would compel younger generations to turn to religion,” Thiessen noted.“None of the Above: Having No Religion in Canada and the U.S.” will be published by early 2020.last_img read more

Insurers Look to Pass Drug Price Breaks Straight to Consumer

first_imgBy The Associated PressSome major health insurers plan to take a little sting out of prescription drug prices by giving customers rebates at the pharmacy counter.Aetna and UnitedHealthcare both say they will begin passing rebates they get from drugmakers along to some customers starting next year. They could spark a trend: The idea has been championed by President Donald Trump, and it’s something other bill-payers like major employers might consider.Aetna and UnitedHealthcare both say they will begin passing rebates they get from drugmakers along to some of their customers starting next year. (AP Photo/Bill Sikes)Rebates are a key cog in the largely secretive pricing agreements ironed out between drugmakers and pharmacy benefit managers, the companies that manage prescriptions for insurers and large employers. Rebates have become more common in recent years, and some critics point to them as a factor behind soaring drug costs. Aetna and UnitedHealthcare say they want to make prescription drug pricing more transparent and simplify the process for customers.Here’s a look at the issue.Who gets the rebate?Pharmaceutical companies offer rebates to benefits managers as a carrot to get their drugs included in formularies, or lists of covered drugs. These concessions are usually a percentage of the initial price set by the drugmaker, or the list price.Pharmacy benefit managers typically pass rebates on to the insurers and large employers that hire them. Those clients often use the money to reduce their plan’s spending on drugs or the cost of coverage. Only 4 percent said they passed rebates directly to customers at the point of sale, or when they buy the drug, the Pharmacy Benefit Management Institute found in a 2017 report.Will you start receiving them soon?That’s unlikely.Aetna estimates that 3 million customers could receive rebates when it starts offering them next year, while UnitedHelathcare’s plan will initially apply to over 7 million people. Those are big numbers but small slices of the more than 67 million U.S. customers these companies cover in total.In addition, CVS Health’s pharmacy benefits business offers point-of-sale rebates through plans that cover about 10 million of its 94 million customers.More insurers or benefits managers could follow these examples, and big employers that pay their own health care bills also might start passing the rebates to people on their health plans, said Ana Gupte, an insurance industry analyst with Leerink.Plus Trump has proposed giving rebates directly to Medicare prescription drug customers.Rebates delivered directly to the consumer may be attractive to insurers and pharmacy benefit managers because they can help polish their image. Rebates give the companies a tangible benefit they can show consumers instead of saying generally that these refunds help keep overall coverage costs in check, noted Benedic Ippolito, an economist with the American Enterprise Institute.“At a minimum, it sounds like insurers are trying to do something for consumers with high drug costs,” he said.Aare we talking big money?It’s hard to forecast how big the rebates will be. Experts say they could knock anywhere from a few bucks off your prescription bill to more than $100.The rebates are generally not disclosed by companies, and their size depends on factors like competition and the amount of the drug sold.Treatments that have competition may deliver the biggest rebates because pharmaceutical companies are jockeying to have their medicines included in formularies.Discounts and rebates for high-cost specialty medicines usually are lower than those for more traditional drugs, according to the IQVIA Institute for Human Data Science, which studies prescription drug spending.The consumers who will benefit most are those who take prescription drugs regularly and pay a lot for their medicines out of pocket, or before insurance coverage starts.“It reduces the cost of having a chronic illness somewhat,” said Dan Mendelson, president of the consulting firm Avalere Health.But there may be a price to pay: The cost of coverage could rise for everyone on a given health plan if rebates are no longer being used to keep overall plan expenses in check.last_img read more