WHS CATS To Hold Fundraiser At Panera Bread On September 28

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA – Looking for an excuse to eat out?The WHS Choral and Theatre Support Group (WHS CATS) is holding a Fundraiser at Wilmington’s Panera Bread (228 Main Street, Wilmington Plaza) this Friday, September 28, from 11am to 8pm.Print and bring the flyer below and 10%-20% of your bill will benefit the WHS CATS mission to provide scholarships to graduating seniors as well as supplementary funding, as needed, to the WHS Lamplighters Drama Guild, WHS SoundScape a cappella, WHS Chorus, and WHS One Minute Too Many Improv Troupe.Panera Gift Cards are excluded from the event.Have a question? Email Wilmington.C.A.T.S.Parents@gmail.com.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedWHS Class of 2022 To Hold Fundraiser At Panera Bread On May 21In “Community”WHS CATS To Hold Fundraiser At Panera Bread On May 10In “Community”WHS CATS To Hold Fundraiser At Panera Bread On January 18In “Community”last_img read more

Criterion streaming service launches April 8 in US Canada

first_img Aug 31 • iPhone XR vs. iPhone 8 Plus: Which iPhone should you buy? Apple That’s web-only, but apps will launch on desktop, Apple TV, Amazon Fire, Roku, iOS and Android devices on April 8, it said.It’ll offer more than 1,000 classic and contemporary films from its library, nightly thematic programming, a Sunday Spotlight series, a Tuesday short film, its Adventures in Moviegoing (a guest-curated series that’s previously featured Barry Jenkins and Guillermo del Toro) and other features. 3 Time Warner Android Pie HBO Amazon AT&T Roku Apple Criterion’s only confirming a US and Canada launch initially, and said via email that it’ll keep us posted about plans for an international release.WarnerMedia, which comprises HBO, Turner and Warner Bros, became a subsidiary of AT&T after the phone company’s $85 billion megamerger with Time Warner last June.First published Jan. 31 at 4:49 a.m. PT.Updated Feb. 1 at 1:59 a.m. PT: Adds Criterion comment on international release. Stream these 2019 Oscar nominees now Now playing: Watch this: Sep 1 • iPhone 11, Apple Watch 5 and more: The final rumors 2:33 77 Photos See it Share your voice Mentioned Above Amazon Fire TV and Movies Internet Services Preview • Amazon introduces world’s first reasonable $50 tablet (hands-on) Amazon Fire Comments CNET may get a commission from retail offers. See All Aug 31 • Best places to sell your used electronics in 2019 News • Apple Music is now available on Amazon Fire TV You’ll be able to use The Criterion Channel on desktop, Apple TV, Amazon Fire, Roku, iOS and Android devices in April. Criterion The Criterion Channel, Criterion’s streaming service for film lovers, will launch on April 8 in the US and Canada.You can sign up for a subscription now and it’ll set you back $11 a month (or $100 a year). It’s a little cheaper if you sign up before April 8, with Charter Subscribers paying $10 a month (or $90 a year).It’s the same pricing model we heard about back in November, when WarnerMedia announced the FilmStruck replacement.Charter Subscribers also get an exclusive movie of the week between sign-up and launch — the first being its newly released Criterion edition of 1976’s Mikey and Nicky. • 2019 movies to geek out over reading • Criterion streaming service launches April 8 in US, Canada Our first Movie of the Week is MIKEY AND NICKY! Charter Subscribers can watch our full edition of Elaine May’s 1976 masterpiece now alongside our special features! 📽️ pic.twitter.com/cJSSyQWTKA— Criterion Channel (@criterionchannl) January 30, 2019 Tags $35 Review • Amazon Fire review: Is this $50 tablet any good? We tell you why it is and isn’t. Aug 31 • Your phone screen is gross. Here’s how to clean itlast_img read more

Federal Appeals Court Upholds Texas Campus Carry Law

first_img Share Shelby KnowlesUniversity of Texas at Austin faculty and students protest Texas’ recently passed campus carry law on Nov. 10, 2015.The 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Thursday upheld Texas’ campus carry law, delivering another clear victory to the state in a longshot, long-running lawsuit brought by University of Texas at Austin professors opposed to the law.In July 2016, three professors claimed that a 2015 state law that allows licensed gun-owners to carry concealed weapons into most public university buildings would have a “chilling effect” on free speech in their classrooms. But a federal district judge threw out their case in July 2017, saying the professors didn’t present any “concrete evidence to substantiate their fears.”Accepting that logic and advancing it yet further, a three-judge panel on the appeals court this week rebuffed the professors’ free speech claim as well as two other constitutional challenges they had made.Like the lower court, the 5th Circuit panel found that the professors lacked standing to challenge the law because they had not sufficiently shown how it might harm them.“[The professors] cannot manufacture standing by self-censoring her speech based on what she alleges to be a reasonable probability that concealed-carry license holders will intimidate professors and students in the classroom,” Judge Leslie Southwick wrote for the unanimous panel.Renea Hicks, the lawyer to professors Jennifer Lynn Glass, Lisa Moore and Mia Carter said late Thursday night it was too soon to comment on any potential plans for an appeal. But he said he does not expect to try to move the case forward at the 5th Circuit, historically a politically conservative appeals court.“I seriously doubt there’ll be a request for rehearing or rehearing en banc at the 5th Circuit level,” Hicks said. The plaintiffs have 90 days from the ruling to ask the U.S. Supreme Court to hear the case.Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, a named defendant in the lawsuit, praised Thursday’s news.“The lawsuit was filed because the professors disagreed with the law, not because they had any legal substance to their claim,” Paxton said in a statement Thursday. “The right to keep and bear arms is guaranteed for all Americans, including college students, and the 5th Circuit’s decision prevents that right from being stripped away by three individuals who oppose the law enacted by the Legislature.”The clear, unanimous ruling overwhelmingly sided with Texas’ arguments.In addition to the free speech claim, the professors had also lobbed a Second Amendment complaint, that the campus carry law was unconstitutional because guns on campus were not “well regulated”; and a Fourteenth Amendment complaint, that the professors were denied equal protection under the laws because there was no “rational basis” for where guns were allowed — on public campuses but not most private schools, for example.The appeals court found both arguments unconvincing. Texas had good reasons — property rights and public safety among them — for allowing guns in some school buildings but not others, the court said. And the panel rejected the professors’ reading of the Second Amendment.Texas’ campus carry law, passed in 2015 and effective at four-year schools in 2016, drew immediate outcry from campuses like the UT-Austin. But since it went into effect, that outrage has largely quieted down, and it has been hard to identify much impact on campus life.Disclosure: The University of Texas at Austin has been a financial supporter of The Texas Tribune, a nonprofit, nonpartisan news organization that is funded in part by donations from members, foundations and corporate sponsors. Financial supporters play no role in the Tribune’s journalism. Find a complete list of them here.last_img read more

What Canadians need to know about Trumps travel ban

first_img Share Tuesday, June 27, 2017 The Canadian Press Tags: Donald Trump What Canadians need to know about Trump’s travel bancenter_img Posted by OTTAWA — The Trudeau government is waiting for more details on a U-S Supreme Court decision to partially reinstate President Donald Trump’s ban on travellers from six mainly Muslim countries.But a spokesman for Immigration Minister Ahmed Hussen said dual nationals from the affected countries travelling on Canadian passports will not be subject to the restrictions.He adds Canadian permanent residents from the six designated countries who have valid resident cards and valid U.S. visas, and are deemed eligible by U.S. border authorities to enter the U.S., would not be denied entry.The government is advising all people planning travel to the U.S. to verify admission requirements ahead of time.The federal New Democrats, meanwhile, criticized Prime Minister Justin Trudeau for refusing to personally speak out against the ban.The U.S. high court decision is a political victory for Trump after two lower appeal courts overturned his earlier attempts at imposing a ban.The court said the ban can be enforced on travellers from Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen if they lack a “credible claim of a bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States.”More news:  Honolulu authorities investigate arsons at 3 Waikiki hotels; no injuries reportedThe U.S. high court said it would hear full arguments in October on the ban. << Previous PostNext Post >>last_img read more